Plus Two English Textbook Answers Unit 4 Chapter 2 Rice (Poem)

Kerala Plus Two English Textbook Answers Unit 4 Chapter 2 Rice (Poem)

Read and Respond (Textbook)

Question 1.
of all the memories of his homeland, the narrator thinks of “rice” first. What does this show?
Answer:
The staple food of his homeland is dearer to a person than anything else. And to the people of Kerala, wherever they are, they have a craving for native rice.

Question 2.
What are the memories of the narrator about the paddy cultivating season?
Answer:
His father in his yellow mud-stained handloom dhoti, people carrying tender saplings, shouts of ploughing with several oxen, excitement of the farmers about the waters of Varanganal canal, and the baskets full if rice along the dyke are the memories of the narrator about the paddy cultivating season.

Question 3.
The narrator wants the train to move a little faster. What does this tell us about his feeling for his native village?
Answer:
He longs to be in his homeland to join the hustle and bustle of the village at the earliest and enjoy everything there.

Question 4.
What changes in the native village does the narrator notice on his return?
Answer:
On his return, he finds that the place has completely changed. Tall rubber trees have taken the place of rich paddy fields. There is no sound. Nobody is busy with the paddy cultivation. His father quietly sits watching the people fix up the machines for making rubber sheets. He sees a change in attitude too.

Question 5.
Rubber plants have taken the place of paddy. What does this imply?
Answer:
This implies the change in attitude of the people. They switched to the cultivation of more profitable cash crops.

Question 6.
“Only fools turn to rice-farming for gain”. Why does the father say so?
Answer:
It sounds foolish to him to cultivate paddy, as the government gives rice to those who have no paddy fields. He prudently thinks of making money on one side and availing all government allotments.

Question 7.
What does “ship of the sky” represent?
Answer:
The ship of the sky represents the aeroplane.

Question 8.
“Can we get some husk from the Centre, too, to make toys with it?” Bring out the satire in these lines?
Answer:
It was for making toys out of husk that he got his doctoral degree and was highly praised by the scholars in North India. Just as a prophet is not identified in his own land, rice and husk are rejected as non profitable. People of Kerala do not know the value of such food crops and they run for quick cash. The poet satirists on this thoughtless attitude of our people.

Think and Write (Textbook)

Question 1.
Why does the narrator feel confused as he walks home?
Answer:
The narrator was confused because the place had completely changed. Instead of the palm thatched houses which could be seen in the distance he could see rubber trees. He thought whether he had got his path lost or he had taken the wrong path.

Question 2.
Why does the father wear a contemporary look?
Answer:
The father wears a contemporary look because his attitude has completely changed and he has become modern too. He seems to be happy and contented with his modern lifestyle.

Question 3.
What changes have occurred in the life style of the farmers when they shifted from food crops to cash crops?
Answer:
When farmers shifted from food crops to cash crops their whole life changed. They no longer have to work in clay and mud. There is no hustle and bustle, no shouts of ploughing. They have learned to live with the rations given by the government

Question 4.
Read the following lines from the poem and note how the poet has satirised the shift from paddy cultivation to rubber planting.

My father says, with obvious pride: Son, we’ve stopped working on all the rice. It was quite inconvenient. Cite other instances of satire in the poem.
Answer:

  1. My little brother runs in to meet me..I, eager to have a full meal of athikira rice. He’s carrying the rations for the whole household He trips over something and scatters the wheat all over the yard.
  2. Above us, a ‘ship of the sky’ roars northwards, drowning my brother’s loud cries the Chief Minister’s off like an arrow to the Centre to clamour for more grains, now flying high above the cash crops, now growing tall like the trees, since no one here promotes the farming of rice.
  3. Can we get some husk from the Centre, too, to make toys with it? I don’t know.

Question 5.
The poem is a contrast between expectations and reality. Prepare a write-up substantiating this.
Answer:
The narrator returns home with lots of expectations about his homeland. He broods over the picture of the rice planting season with all its hustle and bustle. He dreams how cautiously he walks along the dyke in order not to upset the basket full of rice and reach home right at the time when his mother drains the cooked rice. With an eagerness to reach home at the earliest, he even urges the train to run faster. But reality was just the opposite of what he expected. To his great surprise and shock he finds that the place has completely changed and gets confused with his path.

Tali rubber trees have taken the place of rich paddy fields. There is no sound. Nobody is busy with the paddy cultivation. His father proudly sits watching the people fix up the machines for making rubber sheets. With the least little sentiment and with a little pride his father said that they have stopped paddy farming as it is not profitable. It sounds foolish to him to cultivate paddy, as the government gives rice to those who have no paddy fields. The narrator was all the more shocked to see his brother comes carrying the rations of wheat.

Question 6.
Comment on the style of writing of the poem?
Answer:
Among the great poets in Malayalam, Chemmanam Chacko has created a space for himself by reflecting the sorrow of the common man, through his poems. In order to emphasise his strong social message, he has adopted the satirical style because humour has the capacity to take the message more effectively to the audience. ‘Rice, deals with the plight of the farmer who has to move away from food crops to cash crops.

The poem shows his commitment to question the social evils and attitudes of people. For this, he has devised a language that has an organic relation with the layman’s language. This language is prudently used in the poem ‘Rice, because he believes that he is speaking about issues people want to When most poems follow a specific rhythmic structure, which forms the metre of the poem, ‘Rice, translated from Malayalam, follows free verse which does not use steady meter patterns, rhyme, or any other musical pattern. It thus follows the rhythm of natural speech.

Activity 1: Critical Appreciation

Tips to prepare critical appreciation:

Introduction About the poem (theme
Direct meaning Implied meaning
Summary Direct Meaning
Implied Meaning
Author’s arguments Describes with supporting points or quotes
Critic’s evaluation Whether the poem is relevant, useful, I important, significant, valid, or truthful

Question 1.
Prepare a critical appreciation of the poem in the light of your responses to the questions above.
Answer:
Among the great poets in Malayalam, Chemmanam Chacko has created a space for himself by sharply satirising the social evils with pungent verse. “Rice, mourns the loss of paddy fields to rubber plantations. In order to emphasise the strong social message, he has adopted the satirical style because humour has the capacity to take the message more effectively to the audience.

“Rice, written in 1967, cemented his place as a satirist among Malayalam poets. The poem received a flush of praise for its strong social message. The poem deals with the plight of the farmers who have been forced to move away from food crops to cash crops as the market for food crops fell. Even when there is shortage of rice in the State, people rush towards cash crops like rubber, with active support from the government. People have started to rely on government rations of wheat instead of becoming self reliant on our selves by cultivating paddy.

This background for the poem is beautifully expressed through the nostalgic feelings of the speaker returning to Kerala, after having taken his doctoral degree from North India for his innovations and products made from rice husk. To his great shock and dismay he found that everything in his land had changed.

The writer comments sharply on the change in the attitude of the people. His father, who said with the least little sentiment and with a little pride, that they have stopped paddy farming as it is not profitable, represents the common people.

The narrator sarcastically concludes the poem commenting on the Chief Minister who flies high above the cash crops to the centre to demand for allotment of more rice. He pathetically asks himself whether we get some husk from the centre too. It is seen that decadence in public and social life has given enough material to the satirist in Mr. Chacko. His works show his commitment to question the social evils. For this, he has devised a language that has an organic relation with the layman’s language. This language is prudently used in the poem ‘Rice, because he believes that he is speaking about people’s serious issues. The poem ‘Rice’ is translated from Malayalam and is written in free verse. It thus follows the rhythm of natural speech. This style has made the poem more readable and gained it public appeal.

Activity 2: Write-up

Question 1.
Chemmanam Chacko is a master satirist who has fought many a battle with the system through his writings, laced with scorn and sarcasm. He says, ‘Socio-political sphere is much meek and limited compared with earlier times. Society has changed and, with it, have the mass sensibilities. Consider his poem “Rice” as a satire on the farmers who are forced to switch to cash crops when the market for food crops fell. Prepare a writeup?
Answer:
Chemmanam Chacko is a master satirist who has fought many a battle with the system through his writings. The poet who has a stock of literary works to his credit has always reacted to the social evils with pungent verse. He resorted to writing satires as he realised that humour had the capacity to take his message more effectively to the audience.

‘Rice’, cemented his place as a satirist among Malayalam poets. The poem received a flush of praise for its strong social message. Even when there is shortage of rice in the State, people rush towards cash crops like rubber, with active support from the government. People bave started to rely on government rations of wheat instead of becoming self reliant by cultivating paddy. That is the background for this poem. The poem deals with the plight of the farmers who have been forced to move away from food crops to cash crops as the market for food crops fell. The idea is clearly depicted in the lines “Son, we’ve stopped working on all the rice. It was quite inconvenient. The farmer gained nothing Only fools turn to rice-farming for gain. This is better money.” He comments sharply on the change in attitude of the people who, once had rice as their staple food, are contented with the ration of wheat by the government.

The dependence of the state to the centre for more allotment of rice is another sharp criticism of the people who demand the government to ask for more and more from the centre. People of Kerala are becoming lazy and money minded. They want the government to provide them the basic needs whereas they are busy making money for their luxuries.

Activity 3 : Paragraph Writing

Question 1.
Instead of a system of values, we have the market ruling us, making decisions for us. Consider this statement in the light of the poem “Rice” by Chemmanam Chacko.
Answer:
Today people worship money regardless of how it is earned, hunt for pleasure, no matter where it is found, chase power and fame regardless of the cost to their integrity. This idea is underlined in the poem “Rice’ by Cheramanam Chacko. The poet satirises the farmers who switch to cash crops from food crops as they found it more profitable and attractive. They forget the truth that it cost them a lot since rice is the staple food of Kerala and they have to run short of it, if it is not cultivated indigenously. People, who run madly after money, are not ashamed even to plead for more allotment of wheat and rice from the centre.

Here we see that people are ready to gain money at the cost of values and self respect. The basic human values and sentiments are set aside when consumerism and greed rule people. It is lack of right understanding of the values of life that account for the prevalence of materialism in the world.

Rice Profile

Chemmanam Chacko is a master satirist who has fought many a battle with the system through his writings. Nellu, written in 1967, cemented his place as a satirist among Malayalam poets. The poem received a flush of praise for its strong social mes sage. The poem was later translated into English by Prof. K Ayyappa Paniker and titled Rice There was a great famine in this state.
HSSlive Plus Two English Textbook Answers Unit 4 Chapter 2 Rice (Poem) 3
People switched from the cultivation of paddy towards more profitable cash crops like rubber, with active support from the government. This finally forced people to rely on government rations. That was the background for this poem.The poem deals with the plight of the farmers who have been forced to move away from food crops to cash crops. His verse mourns the loss of fields to concrete jungles.

Rice Summary in English

The poem begins with the nostalgic feelings of the narrator who returns to his home land in Kerala after having earned the doctorate degree from North India for his work on making toys with husk. He is fed up with eating chapaties there and dreams of a sumptuous meal of Athikira rice.

The picture of the rice planting season passes through his mind. He sees his father in his mud stained dhoti, calling out in excitement. He imagines that the oxen will be surprised to see him with his suitcase and his father will greet him with his custom ary stinginess in smiling, His brother, carrying the tender saplings, will rush to the house calling out to mother that he has arrived. He dreams how cautiously he walks along the dyke in order not to upset the basket full of rice and reach home right at the time when his mother drains the cooked rice. With an eagerness to reach home at the earliest, he even urges the train to run faster. But to his great surprise and shock he finds that the place has completely changed and he has got confused with his path. Tall rubber trees have taken the place of rich paddy fields.

There is no sound. Nobody is busy with the paddy cultivation His father quietly sits watching the people fix up the machines for making rubber sheets. With the least little sentiment and with a little pride his father said that they had stopped paddy farming as it not profitable. It sounds foolish to him to cultivate paddy, as the government gives rice to those who have no paddy fields. The narrator was all the more shocked to see his brother coming with the rations of wheat.

The narrator sarcastically concludes the poem commenting on the Chief Minister who flies high above the cash crops to the Centre to demand for allotment of more rice. He pathetically asks himself whether we get some husk from the Centre too.

Rice Summary in Malayalam
HSSLive Plus Two English Textbook Answers Unit 4 Chapter 2 Rice (Poem) 1

HSSLive Plus Two English Textbook Answers Unit 4 Chapter 2 Rice (Poem) 2
HSSLive Plus Two English Textbook Answers Unit 4 Chapter 2 Rice (Poem) 3

Rice Glossary
HSSLive Plus Two English Textbook Answers Unit 4 Chapter 2 Rice (Poem) 4
HSSLive Plus Two English Textbook Answers Unit 4 Chapter 2 Rice (Poem) 5

Plus Two English Textbook Answers

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